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Speakers

The following people are confirmed conference speakers. Additional speakers will be announced shortly. Please check back for updates.

Euan A. Ashley, MRCP, DPhil
Assistant Professor
Cardiovascular Medicine
Stanford University

Ralph Brindis, MD, MPH, FACC, FSCAI
President
American College of Cardiology
Clinical Professor of Medicine
University of California, San Francisco
Senior Advisor for Cardiovascular Disease
Kaiser Permanente

G. Steven Burrill
Chief Executive Officer
Burrill & Company

Bruce Nedrow Calonge, MD, MPH
President and CEO
Colorado Trust

Carolyn M. Clancy, MD
Director
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Francis Collins, MD, PhD
Director
National Institutes of Health

Robert T. Croyle, PhD
Director
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences
National Cancer Institute
National Institutes of Health

Susan Dentzer
Editor-in Chief
Health Affairs

Jean-Paul Gagnon, PhD
Pharmaceutical Public Policy Consultant

Hertzel Gerstein, MD, MSc, FRCPC
Professor
Department of Medicine
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
McMaster University

Richard N. Gottfried
Chair
Health Committee
New York State Assembly

Julie Johnson, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS
Professor and Chair
Department of Pharmacotherapy and
Translational Research
Professor of Pharmaceutics
V. Ravi Chandran Professor in
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Professor of Medicine (Cardiology)
Director
University of Florida Center for Pharmacogenomics

Barry Kramer, MD, MPH
Office of Disease Prevention
National Institutes of Health

Joel Kupersmith, MD
Chief Research and Development Officer
Veterans Health Administration
Department of Veterans Affairs

Michael Lauer, MD, FACC, FAHA
Director
Division of Cardiovascular Sciences
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
National Institutes of Health

Jeffrey C. Lerner, PhD
President and Chief Executive Officer
ECRI Institute

Susan Love, MD, MBA
President
Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation

David Meltzer, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Medicine
University of Chicago

Frances Miller, JD
Professor of Law
Boston University School of Law
Professor of Public Health, Boston University School of Public Health
Professor of Health Care Management, Boston University School of Management
Visiting Professor of Law, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Elizabeth G. Nabel, MD
President
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

 

Lee Newcomer, MD
Senior Vice President
Oncology
United Healthcare

Wilson D. Pace, MD
Department of Family Medicine
University of Colorado DARTNet

Amy P. Patterson, MD
Director
Office of Biotechnology Activities
Acting Director
Office of Science Policy

Bruce Psaty, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine
Epidemiology and Health Services
University of Washington

Stephen Quake, DPhil
Co-Chair
Department of Bioengineering
Investigator
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Professor of Bioengineering
Department of Bioengineering
Stanford University

Scott D. Ramsey, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine and Health Services
Associate Member
Cancer Prevention Research Program
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
University of Washington

Murray Ross, PhD
Vice President
Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.
Director
Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Policy

J. Sanford (Sandy) Schwartz, MD
Leon Hess Professor of Medicine and
Health Management & Economics
University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine and The Wharton School

Jeffrey E. Shuren, MD, JD
Director
Center for Devices and Radiological Health
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Sue Siegel, MS
Partner
Mohr Davidow Ventures

Jean Slutsky
Director
Center for Outcomes and Evidence
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Barry M. Straube, MD
Chief Medical Officer and Director
Office of Clinical Standards and Quality
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Robert Temple, MD
Director
Office of Medical Policy
Center for Drug Evaluation and Research
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Steven Teutsch, MD, MPH
Chief Science Officer
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

Sean Tunis, MD, MSc
Founder and Director
Center for Medical Technology Policy

Philip S. Wang, MD, DrPH
Deputy Director
National Institute of Mental Health
National Institutes of Health

Gail Wilensky, PhD
Economist and Senior Fellow
Project HOPE

Janet Woodcock, MD
Director
Center for Drug Evaluation and Research
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Clyde Yancy, MD, FACC, FAHA, MACP
Medical Director
Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute
Chief
Cardiothoracic Transplantation
Baylor University Medical Center
Immediate-Past President
American Heart Association




Euan A. Ashley, MRCP, DPhil

Euan Angus Ashley is Assistant Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University, California and Director of the Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease.

Born and raised in Scotland, Dr Ashley graduated with 1st class Honors in Physiology and Medicine from the University of Glasgow in 1996. After completing residency at the University of Oxford’s John Radcliffe Hospital, he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Clinician Scientist fellowship to join the PhD program in Molecular Cardiology at the University of Oxford. His work elucidating a role for intra-myocardial nitric oxide in cardiac contractility attracted Young Investigator awards from the UK Medical Research Society, the European Society of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. In 2002, he moved to California to work with Thomas Quertermous, Chief of the Division of Cardiology at Stanford University. As a Reynolds foundation fellow, he applied high dimensional molecular tools to discover novel pathways in atherosclerosis and heart failure, attracting in the process Investigator awards from the American Heart Association and the Heart Failure Society of America. In 2006, he joined the faculty of Stanford. In 2009, he was awarded an NIH Director’s New Innovator award to study nanoscale approaches to allele silencing in cardiomyopathy syndromes. In 2010, he led the bicoastal, Stanford-Harvard collaborative team that carried out the first clinical interpretation of a whole human genome, that of his colleague Stanford Professor Stephen Quake. Dr Ashley is a member of the leadership group of the American Heart Association’s Council on Functional Genomics, Chair of the Program committee of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, and Executive Editor for the Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research.

Father to 4 year old and 4 month year old Americans, in his ‘spare’ time, he tries (and usually fails) to understand baseball, plays the saxophone in a jazz quartet, and conducts research on the health benefits of single malt Scotch whisky.

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Ralph Brindis, MD, MPH, FACC, FSCAI

Dr. Brindis is the Senior Advisor for Cardiovascular Disease for Northern California Kaiser, a Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and on the affiliate faculty of the Phil R. Lee Institute of Health Policy Studies at UCSF. Presently Dr. Brindis is serving as the President of the American College of Cardiology. He received his undergrad education at MIT and has a Master's Degree in Public Health from UCLA. He graduated Emory Medical School Summa Cum Laude. All of his graduate medical training was performed at UCSF as a Resident and Chief Resident in Internal Medicine and then as a Cardiology Fellow. Dr. Brindis has served previously as the ACC Governor of Northern California and as Past President of the California Chapter of the ACC. Dr. Brindis is the immediate past Chief Medical Officer and Chair of the ACC National Cardiovascular Registry (ACC-NCDR) Management Board now overseeing six cardiovascular national registries assessing cardiac catheterization and angioplasty, implantable defibrillators, carotid stenting, acute coronary syndromes, ambulatory cardiovascular treatment and congenital heart disease. He also is the immediate past Chair of the ACC Appropriateness Use Criteria Task Force developing appropriateness criteria for non-invasive testing and coronary revascularization procedures in cardiovascular disease. He has served as Chair of the ACC Quality Strategic Directions Committee. Dr. Brindis was the 2007 recipient of the national ACC Distinguished Fellow Award.

Dr. Brindis is active as a volunteer in the AHA having served on the California Affiliate Board and previously as President and member of the Board of the AHA San Francisco Division. Presently he serves on the AHA Western Affiliate STEMI Mission Life Line Task Force and previously served on the Steering Committee of the national AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Conference. Dr. Brindis sits on the Cardiac Advisory Board of the State of California OSHPD initiative overseeing public reporting of hospital and physician specific CABG mortality. Presently he serves on the NCQA Heart/Stroke Advisory Committee, the Rand-Stanford Comparative Effectiveness Research Advisory Committee, the DAPT –Dual Antiplatelet Platelet Trial Advisory Board and the Data Safety and Monitoring Board of C-PORT Elective. He previously served on the National Blue Ribbon Advisory Committee for Cardiac Care for the Veteran’s Administration and the VA Hospital National CABG Quality Oversight Committee. Dr. Brindis has over one hundred publications in national peer reviewed cardiovascular journals.

Dr. Brindis is a practicing invasive cardiologist with an active practice of consultative cardiology. His major interest in process measures and outcomes assessment in cardiovascular care has led to helping the creation and implementation of various Cardiovascular Guidelines for Northern California Kaiser.

Dr. Brindis is married to Dr. Claire Brindis, Director of the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and the Director of the Center for Reproductive Health Policy Research both at UCSF. Their son Seth is a Fellow in Emergency Pediatrics at UCLA Harbor Hospital and son Daniel practices environmental law in Washington, DC. Dr. Brindis swims on the USF Masters Swim Team and enjoys fine wine and too infrequent golf.

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G. Steven Burrill

G. Steven Burrill has been involved in the growth and prosperity of the biotechnology industry for over 40 years. An early pioneer, Mr. Burrill is one of the original architects of the industry and one of its most avid and sustained developers. He currently serves as Chairman of the Boards of Pharmasset (NASDAQ: VRUS) and Abunda Corporation, and is a member of the Boards of Directors of Catalyst Biosciences, Depomed (NASDAQ: DEPO), NewBridge, Proventys, Targacept (NASDAQ: TRGT) and XDx. Prior to founding Burrill & Company in 1994, he spent 28 years with Ernst & Young, directing and coordinating the firm's services to clients in the biotechnology/life sciences/high technology/manufacturing industries worldwide. In 2002, Mr. Burrill was recognized as a biotech investment visionary by the prestigious Scientific American magazine (The Scientific American 50), and in 2008 he received the BayBio Pantheon 2008 DiNA lifetime achievement award for his worldwide biotech leadership.

In addition to his work with leading life science companies, Mr. Burrill is a founder and currently serves as Chairman of the Board of the Foundation for the National Medals of Science and Technology. Additionally, he serves as Chairman of the San Francisco Mayor’s Biotech Advisory Committee (MAYBAC). Mr. Burrill also chaired the National Research Council study on linkages in biotechnology between Japan and the United States. He was also involved with the US-Japan Science and Technology Agreement Study of Technology Transfer Mechanisms between the US and Japan. Other not-for-profit activities include serving on the Boards of Directors of the Bay Area Science Infrastructure Consortium, BayBio (Emeritus), California Healthcare Institute (Emeritus), The Exploratorium (Emeritus), The Kellogg Center for Biotechnology, the MIT Center for Biomedical Innovation, and the National Health Museum (Vice Chairman), World Council for Ethical Standards (Chairman), Vilas County Economic Development Group (Chairman), BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH), University of Wisconsin Extension, Scientific American Board of Advisors. He also serves on the Purdue Discovery Park External Advisory Committee as well as the editorial board of the Journal of Commercial Biotechnology and is on the advisory boards of the Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies (C-PET), as well as BioAg Gateway, City of Madison. He is an advisor to University of Illinois Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Wisconsin—College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences, and Duke University, and is an adjunct professor at University of California, San Francisco.

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Bruce Nedrow Calonge, MD, MPH

Ned Calonge, MD, MPH, is the President and CEO of The Colorado Trust, a grantmaking foundation dedicated to advancing the health and well-being of the people of Colorado. He is an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the Colorado School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, and an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health.

Outside of the Trust, Dr. Calonge is a member and past President of the Colorado Medical Board, which licenses and regulates physicians. He teaches epidemiology, biostatistics and research methods at the University of Colorado Schools of Medicine and Public Health. He is a member of the Delta Dental Foundation Board, and chairs the Board of Directors for LiveWell, Colorado.

Nationally, Dr. Calonge is the Chair of the United States Preventive Services Task Force and a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Task Force on Community Preventive Services. He the chair of the CDC’s Evaluating Genomic Applications for Practice and Prevention (EGAPP) Workgroup, and is a member of the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau in the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Dr. Calonge received his BA in Chemistry from The Colorado College, his MD from the University of Colorado and his MPH from the University of Washington; he is board certified in both Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Prior to coming to the Trust, Dr. Calonge was the Chief Medical Officer of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment..

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Carolyn M. Clancy, MD

Carolyn M. Clancy, M.D., was appointed Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) on February 5, 2003, and reappointed on October 9, 2009. Prior to her appointment, Dr. Clancy was Director of AHRQ's Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research.

Dr. Clancy, a general internist and health services researcher, is a graduate of Boston College and the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Following clinical training in internal medicine, Dr. Clancy was a Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Before joining AHRQ in 1990, she was also an assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Medical College of Virginia.

Dr. Clancy holds an academic appointment at the George Washington University School of Medicine (Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Medicine) and serves as Senior Associate Editor for the journal Health Services Research. She serves on multiple editorial boards, including Annals of Internal Medicine, Annals of Family Medicine, American Journal of Medical Quality, and Medical Care Research and Review.

Dr. Clancy is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was elected a Master of the American College of Physicians in 2004. In 2009, she was awarded the William B. Graham Prize for Health Services Research.

Dr. Clancy's major research interests include improving health care quality and patient safety and reducing disparities in care associated with patients' race, ethnicity, gender, income, and education. As Director of AHRQ, she launched the first annual report to Congress on health care disparities and health care quality.

Dr. Clancy lives in the Maryland suburbs of Washington, DC, with her husband, Bill. She enjoys jogging, movies, and spending time with her extended family, especially her four nieces, who live in Virginia.

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Francis Collins, MD, PhD

Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., was officially sworn in on Monday, August 17, 2009 as the 16th director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Collins was nominated by President Barack Obama on July 8, and was unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate on August 7.

Dr. Collins, a physician-geneticist noted for his landmark discoveries of disease genes and his leadership of the Human Genome Project, served as director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the NIH from 1993-2008. With Dr. Collins at the helm, the Human Genome Project consistently met projected milestones ahead of schedule and under budget. This remarkable international project culminated in April 2003 with the completion of a finished sequence of the human DNA instruction book.

In addition to his achievements as the NHGRI director, Dr. Collins’ own research laboratory has discovered a number of important genes, including those responsible for cystic fibrosis, neurofibromatosis, Huntington’s disease, a familial endocrine cancer syndrome, and most recently, genes for type 2 diabetes and the gene that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

Dr. Collins has a longstanding interest in the interface between science and faith, and has written about this in The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief (Free Press, 2006), which spent many weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. He is the author of a new book on personalized medicine, The Language of Life: DNA and the Revolution in Personalized Medicine (HarperCollins, 2010).

Dr. Collins received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Virginia, a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Yale University, and an M.D. with honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prior to coming to the NIH in 1993, he spent nine years on the faculty of the University of Michigan, where he was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences. He is the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2007) and the National Medal of Science (2009). On April 22, 2010, Dr. Collins was a co-recipient of the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research.

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Robert T. Croyle, PhD

Robert Croyle, PhD, was appointed director of DCCPS in July 2003. In this role, he is responsible for overseeing a research portfolio and operating budget of nearly a half billion dollars and serves on NCI’s Executive Committee. As a division, DCCPS covers a wide range of scientific domains and disciplines, including epidemiology, behavioral science, surveillance, cancer survivorship, and health services research. He previously served as the division’s associate director for the Behavioral Research Program, leading its development and expansion. Before coming to NCI in 1998, he was professor of psychology and a member of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Prior to that, he was a visiting investigator at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, visiting assistant professor of psychology at the University of Washington, and assistant professor of psychology at Williams College in Massachusetts.

Dr. Croyle received his PhD in social psychology from Princeton University in 1985, and graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a BA in psychology from the University of Washington in 1978. His research has examined how individuals process, evaluate, and respond to cancer risk information, including tests for inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. His research has been published widely in professional journals in behavioral science, public health, and cancer, and he has edited two volumes: Mental Representation in Health and Illness (1991) and Psychosocial Effects of Screening for Disease Prevention and Detection (1995). He is co-editor of the Handbook of Cancer Control and Behavioral Science (2009) and co-author of Making Data Talk: Communicating Data to The Public, Policy Makers and The Press (2009).

Dr. Croyle is a member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, a Fellow of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, and a recipient of several awards for his research and professional service. His efforts on journal editorial boards include being associate editor for Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, and consulting editor for Health Psychology and the British Journal of Health Psychology. Dr. Croyle received the American Psychological Association Nathan Perry Career Service to Health Psychology Award in 2009. Dr. Croyle received the NIH Merit Award in 1999, 2002 and 2008. He received the NIH Director’s Award in 2000.

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Jean-Paul Gagnon, PhD

Dr. Jean-Paul Gagnon was Senior Director of US Policy and Strategic Advocacy at sanofi-aventis US in Bridgewater, NJ. Dr. Gagnon received his PhD in Pharmacy Administration from the Ohio State University and his B.S. in pharmacy and M.S. in Pharmacy Administration from the University of Connecticut.

He is a former professor and division head of Pharmacy Administration in the School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina and has worked for sanofi-aventis for twenty two years. In 1981-82, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow in Washington, D.C. and worked as a committee staff person on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Health.

He was president of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy for the 1985 – 86 year. Dr. Gagnon received the 1986 American Pharmaceutical Association Foundation/Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Achievement Award in Economic, Social, and Administrative Sciences. He served as Treasurer of the American Pharmaceutical Association from 1991 till 1997 and received the Hugo H. Schaefer award for voluntary contributions to society, the profession of pharmacy, and the APhA in 2002. He also served as President of the International Association of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research from 1996 till 1997 and as Treasurer from 1998 till 2004. He served as Board of Trustee member and Treasurer for the United States Pharmacopeia from 1995 till 2005.

In his past present position, he was responsible for sanofi-aventis US’ involvement with comparative effectiveness, health information technology, and governmental health issues. He continues to follow these and other evolving health policy issues

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Julie Johnson, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS

Dr. Johnson is an expert in clinical pharmacology and pharmacogenomics, with particular focus on the pharmacogenomics of cardiovascular drugs. She is PI of the hypertension-focused research group within the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network, with work focused on short-term blood pressure and adverse metabolic responses, along with longterm adverse cardiovascular outcomes and new onset diabetes. She is also actively involved in warfarin pharmacogenomics research, including serving as leader of the International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium, as the Vice-Chair of the Executive Committee for NHLBI’s Clarification of Optimal Anticoagulation through Genetics (COAG) trial, and as a COAG site PI.

 

 

 

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Barry Kramer, MD, MPH

Dr. Kramer is the Associate Director for Disease Prevention at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. He serves as Chairman of the Physician Data Query (PDQ) Editorial Board on Screening and Prevention and is a member of the PDQ Treatment Editorial Board. Dr. Kramer has served on the Cancer Prevention Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and was the committee chairperson from 2006 to 2007. He currently serves on the ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Committee.

Dr. Kramer received his medical degree from the University of Maryland Medical School, and completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri. He completed a medical oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute (U.S.). He is board-certified in internal medicine and medical oncology, and has received a master’s degree in public health from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Dr. Kramer has extensive experience in cancer treatment studies, primary prevention studies, as well as clinical screening trials of lung, ovarian, breast and prostate cancers. He is medical officer for two large cancer screening trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, Ovarian (PLCO) Trial; and the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). He has a strong interest in weighing and reporting the strength of medical evidence and sponsors an annual Medicine in the Media Workshop to help working journalists develop methods of reporting medical evidence.

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Jeffery C. Lerner, PhD

Dr. Jeffrey C. Lerner has served since 2001 as President and Chief Executive Officer of ECRI Institute, the world’s largest independent nonprofit health technology assessment organization that researches the best approaches to improving patient care. It is a Collaborating Center of the World Health Organization with terms of reference in technology, risk management and patient safety. It is also designated as an Evidence-based Practice Center by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and is listed as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Prior to this, Dr. Lerner held the position of Vice President for Strategic Planning for 17 years. He played the key role in setting the course for ECRI Institute’s transition from its origins as a medical device evaluation laboratory to a broader health research organization that assesses clinical procedures and drug therapies in addition to medical devices, worldwide. He has conceived of, secured funding for, and implemented numerous programs in technology assessment. He was the first Center Director of ECRI Institute’s Evidence-based Practice Center under the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and Coordinator of the Technical Expert Panel of the National Guideline Clearinghouse™ . He also served as a member of the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee until 2003 and is currently on the Advisory Board of the U.S. Cochrane Collaboration Center.

Dr. Lerner made major presentations to government agencies and professional organizations worldwide and has written articles such as “The National Patient Library™: Evidence-based Information for Consumers,” which appeared in the winter 1998 issue of the International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care and “The Consequences of Secret Prices: The Politics of Physician Preference Items,” published in Health Affairs in November 2008.

Dr. Lerner received his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University, where he was awarded three University President's Fellowships and other honors. His B.A. is from Antioch College, and his business training is from the Wharton School. He also studied abroad at St. Andrew's University, Scotland.

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Susan Love, MD, MBA

Susan M Love, MD, MBA has dedicated her professional life to the eradication of breast cancer. As President of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation, she oversees an active $4 million dollar research program centered on breast cancer cause and prevention. She is also a Clinical Professor of Surgery at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine.

Dr. Susan Love is best known as a trusted guide to women worldwide through her books and the Foundation website. The completely revised fourth edition of Dr. Susan Love’s Breast Book termed “the bible for women with breast cancer” by The New York Times; was released October 2005, and the 5th edition will be coming out in 2010.

A true visionary, Susan Love’s most recent project, the Love/Avon Army of Women, is a creative Internet solution to partner women and scientists in order to accelerate basic translational research.

Dr. Love received her medical degree from SUNY Downstate Medical Center in New York, did her surgical training at Boston’s Beth Israel Hospital. She founded the Faulkner Breast Center in Boston and the Revlon UCLA Breast Center in Los Angeles. She has a business degree from the Executive MBA program at UCLA’s Anderson School.

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Frances Miller, JD

Frances H. Miller has been Professor of Law at Boston University’s School of Law since 1975. She has taught courses on Health Law, Food & Drug Law, Antitrust in the Health Sector, Health Care Resource Allocation, Trusts & Estates, Family Law, and Estate Planning. She has also served since 1983 as Professor of Public Health at the Boston University School of Public Health, and in 1997 was appointed Professor of Health Care Management at Boston University's School of Management as well. She was Of Counsel to the Boston Law Firm of Nutter, McClennen & Fish from 1993 - 2009.

Professor Miller is a cum laude graduate of Boston University School of Law and earned her undergraduate degree from Mount Holyoke College, where she majored in political science and economics. She also studied international economic law at the London School of Economics. Appointed a Fulbright Scholar for 1991 and again for 1998, and awarded a Kellogg Foundation Fellowship from 1983 - 1986, she has written widely for law review publications and medical journals focusing on health care issues, including antitrust in the health sector and food & drug law. A specialist on comparative health systems, she has held visiting appointments at Cambridge and Oxford Universities and the London School of Economics, as well as at the University of Queensland in Australia. She was a Visiting Professor at the University of Houston in 2006, and has been Visiting Professor at the University of Hawaii since 2008.

Professor Miller has twice been a trustee of Mount Holyoke College, and was a trustee of the Joslin Diabetes Center for nine years. She also served as a member or Chair of the Health Facilities Appeals Board (Certificate of Need Appeals Agency for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts) for the better part of two decades. In addition she serves on the Institutional Review Board of Partners Health Care System, and is a former Commissioner of the Massachusetts Rate Setting Commission. In 1993 she was a consultant to the White House Task Force on Health Care Reform. Finally, she was a major contributor to and starred in two PBS television series on estate and financial planning, "This is My Will" and "Fiscal Fitness."

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Elizabeth G. Nabel, MD

Elizabeth G. Nabel, M.D. is the President of the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, a position she assumed on January 4, 2010. Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School, has consistently been one of the nation’s leaders in academic health care and one of the largest recipients of NIH research funding. As President, she is responsible for clinical, research, education and community service missions.

Prior to her position at BWH, Dr Nabel served as the Director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In this capacity, Dr. Nabel oversaw an extensive national research portfolio with an annual budget of approximately $3.0 billion to prevent, diagnose, and treat heart, lung, and blood diseases. A native of St. Paul, Minnesota, she attended Weill Cornell Medical College and conducted her internal medicine and cardiovascular training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, followed by faculty positions at the University of Michigan Medical School where she directed the Division of Cardiology and the Cardiovascular Research Center. Among her leadership efforts as NHLBI Director, Dr. Nabel launched new scientific programs in genetics and genomics, stem and progenitor cell biology, translational research, global health, and support for young investigators. She was a strong advocate for comparative effectiveness research (CER), having served on the Federal Coordinating Committee for CER, co-chair of the NIH Coordinating Committee on CER, a member of the Institute of Medicine Evidence-based Medicine Roundtable, and having funded many CER studies through the NHLBI.

As a physician-scientist, Dr. Nabel has made substantial contributions to our understanding of molecular genetics of cardiovascular diseases. She has delineated the mechanisms by which cell cycle and growth factor proteins regulate the proliferation of vascular cells in blood vessels, a process important for the development of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Her current work has focused on the rare premature aging disorder, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome, where she has characterized the smooth muscle cell defect leading to premature heart attack and stroke in children in their early teens.

Her awards include the Willem Einthoven Award; the Amgen-Scientific Achievement Award; the American Heart Association Distinguished Achievement Awards; the Eugene Braunwald Academic Mentorship Award; the Distinguished Alumni Award from Weill Cornell Medical College; the Lewis Katz Research Prize in Cardiovascular Research and six honorary doctorates. She is a member of the American Academy of the Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine (Council), the Association of American Physicians (Council), and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Nabel has served on Board of Reviewing Editors for Science and currently the Editorial Board of the New England Journal of Medicine and Science Translational Medicine. She is a partner on 17 patents and the author of more than 250 scientific publications.

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Lee Newcomer, MD

Lee N. Newcomer, MD, MHA, is the Senior Vice President, UnitedHealthcare with strategic responsibility for Oncology, Genetics and Women’s Health.

Prior to rejoining United Health Group (UHG), Dr. Newcomer was a founding executive of Vivius, a consumer directed venture that allowed consumers to create their own personalized health plans. From 1991 to 2000, Dr. Newcomer held a number of positions at UHG, including Chief Medical Officer. His work there emphasized the development of performance measures and incentives to improve clinical care. Prior to joining UHG, he was Medical Director for CIGNA Health Care of Kansas City.

Dr. Newcomer is a board certified medical oncologist; he practiced medical oncology for nine years in Tulsa, Oklahoma and Minneapolis (Park Nicollet Clinic).

He is the former Chairman of Park Nicollet Health Services, an integrated system of over 700 physicians and a 400 bed hospital. The group is nationally recognized for its leadership in quality, safety and lean processes.

Dr. Newcomer earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in biology from Nebraska Wesleyan University, an MD degree from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine, and an MS degree in health administration from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine from the University of Nebraska Hospital, and fellowships in medical oncology and administrative medicine from the Yale University School of Medicine and the University of Wisconsin at Madison, respectively.

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Wilson D. Pace, MD

Wilson D. Pace, MD is a Professor of Family Medicine and the Green-Edelman Chair for Practice-based Research at the University of Colorado. He is the director of the American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network, the director of SNOCAP – a consortium of practice-based research networks within the University of Colorado, and the Department of Family Medicine’s Information Services group. Dr. Pace’s research has focused on practice reorganization, practice-based research methodology, electronic data collection techniques and patient safety. He is the primary architect of the Distributed Ambulatory Research in Therapeutics Network (DARTNet) and serves as the principal investigator, co-investigator, or in an advisory capacity to a number of health information technology, behavioral change, and disease specific projects. Wilson was named the Department of Family Medicine’s 2009 “Researcher of the Year”.

 

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Amy P. Patterson, MD

Amy P. Patterson, M.D. is the Acting Associate Director for Science Policy at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In this position, she advises the NIH Director and the 27 NIH Institute and Center Directors.

Dr. Patterson’s primary responsibility is to provide national leadership in the analysis and development of science policy and a wide array of issues pertinent to the national biomedical research enterprise. On behalf of the NIH, she has worked on such matters as the harmonization of federal policies pertinent to the conduct and oversight of clinical research; societal and health implications of genetic technologies; the science, safety and ethics of recombinant DNA research; the federal framework for biosafety oversight; and biosecurity measures to preclude the misuse of legitimate science. To inform these activities, Dr. Patterson manages and staffs key federal advisory committees, including the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society; the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee; and the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity.

Dr. Patterson also manages the NIH Science Management Review Board, a panel of leaders industry and academia established under the NIH Reform Act of 2006. This august group provides advice to the agency on cross-cutting organizational and priority setting issues with a broad impact on how the NIH is run. She also manages a variety of programmatic activities, such as the NIH Office of K-12 Science Education, the Trans-NIH Nanotechnology Task Force, and the NIH program on Public-Private Partnerships. Dr. Patterson also oversees NIH’s policy issues that have a nexus to other federal agencies and thus services as the NIH liaison to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the HHS Office of Human Subjects Protections, in addition to organizations such as the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Patterson maintains an active clinical and scientific career, seeing patients at the NIH Clinical Center and conducting a productive program of basic research. Prior to coming to the NIH, Dr. Patterson was Deputy Director of the Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies in the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at the FDA.

Dr. Patterson received a B.A. from Harvard University and an M.D. from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She completed residency training in internal medicine at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell Medical School, New York Hospital, where she also served as Assistant Chief Resident. She has won many distinguished service awards during her public health career, including the NIH Director’s Award of Merit, FDA Commissioner’s Special Citation, and the U.S. Secretary of Health’s Distinguished Service Award.

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Bruce Psaty, MD, PhD

Bruce M. Psaty, MD, PhD, MPH, is a Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Services; Co-Director of the Cardiovascular Health Research Unit at the University of Washington; an Investigator at Group Health Research Institute, Group Health Cooperative; and a general internist at Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA. He received his MD and PhD in English language and literature from Indiana University and his MPH in epidemiology from the University of Washington. His research interests include cardiovascular epidemiology, hypertension, diabetes, epidemiological methods, drug safety, pharmacoepidemiology, genetics, genomics, and pharmacogenetics. Dr Psaty is the principal investigator on several large epidemiologic studies and has had major roles as a cardiovascular disease epidemiologist at the coordinating centers of NIH-funded multi-center studies, including the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and the Women's Health Initiative. Recently, he collaborated with investigators from other cohort studies to establish the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) consortium, which has published more than 40 meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies of a variety of phenotypes. Dr Psaty has served on various NIH working groups, data-safety monitoring committees, review groups and study sections, including as chair of the NIH Cardiovascular Disease and Sleep Epidemiology Study Section (2004-2006), Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Assessment of the US Drug Safety System (2005-2006), the Executive Committee of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s Strategic Planning Effort (2006-2007), and the Scientific Advisory Board of the Netherlands Biobank Infrastructure. In 2005, he received the University of Washington Outstanding Public Service Award for his work on drug safety. The American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention Council selected Dr Psaty as the Remington Methodology Lecturer (2004) and as the Ancel Keys Memorial Lecturer (2009). Elected memberships include American Epidemiological Society, Association of American Physicians, and fellow of the American Heart Association. Dr Psaty is also a consultant to the FDA Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Studies of Drug Safety and Postmarketing Requirements. With about 500 articles and commentaries in the medical literature, he publishes regularly, serves on the editorial board of several journals, and is a contributing writer at JAMA.

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Stephen Quake, DPhil

Stephen Quake studied physics (BS 1991) and mathematics (MS 1991) at Stanford University before earning his doctorate in physics from Oxford University (1994) as a Marshall scholar. He then spent two years as a post-doc in Nobel Laureate Steven Chu's group at Stanford University developing techniques to manipulate single DNA molecules with optical tweezers. In 1996 Quake joined the faculty of the California Institute of Technology, where he rose through the ranks and was ultimately appointed the Thomas and Doris Everhart Professor of Applied Physics and Physics. Quake moved back to Stanford University in 2004 to help launch a new department in Bioengineering, where he is the Lee Otterson Professor and co-Chair.

Quake’s interests lie at the nexus of physics, biology and biotechnology. Over the course of his career he has sought to use the principles of physics to investigate questions in biology and human health. This has often involved the development and application of new technologies for precision measurement.

He pioneered the development of Microfluidic Large Scale Integration (LSI), demonstrating the first integrated microfluidic devices with thousands of mechanical valves. This technology is helping to pave the way for large scale automation of biology at the nanoliter scale, and in recent years Quake and his collaborators have used it for applications as diverse as discovering a new drug for hepatitis C, mapping the genomes of unculturable environmental microbes, and measuring gene expression in individual cancer stem cells. Commercial versions of microfludic LSI are now used in hundreds of laboratories around the world for diverse purposes.

Quake demonstrated the first successful single molecule DNA sequencing technology, which has been commercially developed and is a leading candidate to deliver the first $1,000 genome. His contributions to genomics also include the first clinical application of next generation sequencing (for non-invasive prenatal diagnostics) and the first measurement of the immune repertoire of an organism. In 2009 he and two co-workers sequenced his genome using the commercial version of the single molecule sequencing technology that he developed, an event that was widely reported in the popular press.

Quake received “Career” and “First” awards from the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health in 1997, was named a Packard Fellow in 1999, was in the inaugural class of NIH Director’s Pioneer Awards in 2004, and in 2005 was selected as an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His contributions to the development of new biotechnology at the interface between physics and biology have been recognized by recent awards from the MIT Technology Review Magazine, Forbes, and Popular Science. He is a founder and scientific advisory board chair of Fluidigm, Inc and Helicos Biosciences, Inc (NASDAQ: HLCS).

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Scott D. Ramsey, MD, PhD

Dr. Ramsey is general internist and health economist. He is a Full Member in the Cancer Prevention Program, Public Health Sciences Division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. He directs the Research and Economic Assessment in Cancer and Healthcare (REACH) group, a multidisciplinary team devoted to clinical and economic evaluations of new and existing cancer prevention, screening and treatment technologies. In addition, Dr. Ramsey is a Professor in the School of Medicine, School of Pharmacy, and an affiliate Professor in the Institute for Public Health Genetics at the University of Washington. He also directs the Cancer Prevention and Survivorship Program at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

Dr. Ramsey's research focuses on economic evaluations in cancer. He has published widely on patterns of care, costs, and cost-effectiveness of treatments for lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. His current studies-funded by the National Cancer Institute, National Human Genome Research Institute, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and several pharmaceutical manufacturers-include two large NCI studies on comparative effectiveness (CE); one of which partners with the Southwest Oncology Group to bring CE principles to cooperative group trials; the second builds partnerships with a number of health insurance and provider groups focused on CE research in diagnostics. Other ongoing research projects include studies that are (1) examining bankruptcy among persons with cancer, (2) developing a genetic screening policy model for colorectal cancer, (3) evaluating decision making for men newly diagnosed prostate cancer, and (4) investigating cancer screening, incidence, treatment, and outcomes for Native Americans diagnosed with cancer. He is co-Chair of the Outcomes and Comparative Effectiveness Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group and is a member of the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum.

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Murray Ross, PhD

Murray Ross is Vice President, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, and leads the Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Policy in Oakland, California. The Institute seeks to leverage evidence and experience from the nation’s largest private integrated health care delivery system to shape policy and practice. His current work focuses on how the U.S. health system can make more effective use of new drugs, devices, and medical procedures and how to encourage greater integration of care delivery to improve quality. Before joining Kaiser Permanente in 2002, Dr. Ross was a policy advisor to the United States Congress. He served five years as the executive director of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, an influential nonpartisan agency charged with making recommendations on Medicare policy issues to the Congress. Previously, he spent nine years at the Congressional Budget Office, ultimately leading the group charged with assessing the budgetary impact of legislative proposals affecting Medicare and Medicaid. Dr. Ross earned his doctorate in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park, and completed his undergraduate work in economics at Arizona State University. He enjoys distance running, writing, and traveling.

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Jeffrey E. Shuren, MD, JD

Dr. Jeffrey Shuren is the Director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the Food and Drug Administration. The Center is responsible for assuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, assuring the safety of radiation-emitting products (such as cell phones and microwaves), and fostering device innovation.

Dr. Shuren first came to the FDA in 1998 and has served in several positions, including the Acting Deputy Commissioner for Policy, Planning, and Budget, Special Counsel to the Principal Deputy Commissioner, Associate Commissioner for Policy and Planning, and Assistant Commissioner for Policy. Dr. Shuren has served as the Director of the Division of Items and Devices, Coverage and Analysis Group at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, as a detailee on the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, and as a Staff Volunteer in the National Institutes of Health’s Cognitive Neuroscience Section where he supervised and designed clinical studies on human reasoning.

Dr. Shuren received his B.S. and M.D. degrees from Northwestern University under its Honors Program in Medical Education. He completed his medical internship at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, his neurology residency at Tufts New England Medical Center, and a fellowship in behavioral neurology and neuropsychology at the University of Florida. He received his J.D. from the University of Michigan. Dr. Shuren joined the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine’s Department of Neurology as an Assistant Professor where he led two active memory disorders clinics and implemented a research program in Alzheimer’s disease and disorders of higher cognitive function.

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Sue Siegel, MS

Sue Siegel is a Partner at Mohr, Davidow Ventures, a top tier Silicon Valley venture firm. She leads investments in companies focused on personalized medicine, enabling platform technologies for biomedical research, and innovative healthcare businesses with disruptive business models. Prior to joining MDV, Sue was President and Director of Affymetrix, Inc., a company that pioneered GeneChip® technology, which helped accelerate the advent of personalized medicine in modern medicine. Sue serves on the board of directors of Pacific Biosciences, Navigenics, RainDance Technologies and On- Q-ity.

Sue is a board member of The Silicon Valley Tech Museum, serves on the Presidents' Circle of the National Academies and as an advisor to the Institute of Medicine. She Chairs the External Relations Committee of The Gladstone Institutes, is a member of YPO, and a Henry Crown Fellow of the Aspen Institute. As part of this Fellowship, Sue and her husband co-founded with Stanford Hospital, Checking-In™, an organization dedicated to serving our aging population. She lives in the San Francisco bay area with her husband and sons.

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Robert Temple, MD

Dr. Robert Temple was recently appointed Deputy Center Director for Clinical Science of FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and is also Acting Director of the Office of Drug Evaluation I (ODE-I). He has served in this capacity since the office's establishment in 1995. Dr. Temple received his medical degree from the New York University School of Medicine in 1967. In 1972 he joined CDER as a review Medical Officer in the Division of Metabolic and Endocrine Drug Products. He later moved into the position of Director of the Division of Cardio-Renal Drug Products. In his current position, Dr. Temple oversees ODE-1 which is responsible for the regulation of cardio-renal, neuropharmacologic, and psychopharmacologic drug products. Dr. Temple has a long-standing interest in the design and conduct of clinical trials and has written extensively on this subject, especially on choice of control group in clinical trials, evaluation of active control trials, trials to evaluate dose-response, and trials using “enrichment” designs.

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Steven Teutsch, MD, MPH

Steven M. Teutsch became the Chief Science Officer, Los Angeles County Public Health in February 2009 where he will continue his work on evidence-based public health and policy. He had been in Outcomes Research and Management program at Merck since October 1997 where he was responsible for scientific leadership in developing evidence-based clinical management programs, conducting outcomes research studies, and improving outcomes measurement to enhance quality of care. Prior to joining Merck he was Director of the Division of Prevention Research and Analytic Methods (DPRAM) at CDC where he was responsible for assessing the effectiveness, safety, and the cost-effectiveness of disease and injury prevention strategies. DPRAM developed comparable methodology for studies of the effectiveness and economic impact of prevention programs, provided training in these methods, developed CDC’s capacity for conducting necessary studies, and provided technical assistance for conducting economic and decision analysis. The Division also evaluated the impact of interventions in urban areas, developed the Guide to Community Preventive Services , and provided support for CDC’s analytic methods. He has served as a member of that Task Force and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force which develops the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services as well as on Americas Health Information Community Personalized Health Care Workgroup and the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Prevention and Practice (EGAPP) Workgroup. He currently chairs the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society, and serves on as well as IOM panels and several subcommittees of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Healthy People 2020.

Dr. Teutsch came to CDC in 1977, where he was assigned to the Parasitic Diseases Division and worked extensively on toxoplasmosis. He was then assigned to the Kidney Donor and subsequently the Kidney Disease Program. He developed the framework for CDC's diabetes control program. He joined the Epidemiology Program Office and became the Director of the Division of Surveillance and Epidemiology where he was responsible for CDC's disease monitoring activities. He became Chief of the Prevention Effectiveness Activity in 1992.

Dr. Teutsch was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received his undergraduate degree in biochemical sciences at Harvard University in 1970, an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health in 1973, and his M.D. from Duke University School of Medicine in 1974. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at Pennsylvania State University, Hershey. He was certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in 1977, the American Board of Preventive Medicine in 1995, and is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Teutsch is an Adjunct Professor at the Emory University School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management and U. No. Carolina School of Public Health.

Dr. Teutsch has published over 150 articles and 6 books in a broad range of fields in epidemiology, including parasitic diseases, diabetes, technology assessment, health services research, and surveillance.

He resides in Los Angeles with his wife Carol Teutsch, M.D.

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Philip S. Wang, MD, DrPH

Philip S. Wang, M.D., Dr.P.H., is the Deputy Director of the National Institute of Mental Health. Prior to joining NIMH, he served on the faculty at Harvard Medical School where his research focused on effectiveness trials, pharmacoepidemiology, pharmacoeconomics, and health services research. He completed his undergraduate, medical school, psychiatry residency, as well as doctoral training in epidemiology, all at Harvard University. Dr. Wang has served as a voting member on the FDA Psychopharmacologic Drugs Advisory Committee, FDA Neurological Devices Panel, and FDA Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee. He also served on the NIMH Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Study Section. He was Chair of the WHO World Mental Health Survey Services Research Work Group. He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-V Task Force and has consulted on several APA Work Groups to develop evidence-based treatment guidelines. Dr. Wang is an author of approximately 170 scientific publications.

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Janet Woodcock, MD

Director, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, FDA. Dr. Woodcock has served FDA as Deputy Commissioner and Chief Medical Officer, Deputy Commissioner for Operations and Chief Operating Officer. In these roles, she oversaw scientific and medical regulatory operations. Dr. Woodcock served as Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research from 1994-2005. She previously held other positions at FDA including Director, Office of Therapeutics Research and Review and Acting Deputy Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Dr. Woodcock received her M.D. from Northwestern Medical School, and completed further training and held teaching appointments at the Pennsylvania State University and the University of California in San Francisco. She joined FDA in 1986.

 

 


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